Here are the essential places to visit in Phoenix, Arizona. The selection is made using the FavRiver scoring system which takes into account the most relevant metrics and expert reviews.
Last update : Jul 02, 2019
6Piestewa Peak
Piestewa Peak (py-ES-tə-wah; O'odham: Vainom Do'ag, formerly Squaw Peak), at 2,610 feet (796 m) is the second highest point in the Phoenix Mountains, after Camelback Mountain, and the third highest in the city of Phoenix, Arizona. It is located in the Piestewa Peak Recreation Area within the Phoenix Mountain Preserve, near Piestewa Parkway (Arizona State Highway 51). Piestewa Peak is named in honor of Army Spc. Lori Ann Piestewa, the first known Native American woman to die in combat in the U.S. military, and the first female soldier to be killed in action in the 2003 Iraq War.
Piestewa Peak
7Arizona State Capitol
The Arizona State Capitol in Phoenix, Arizona, United States, was the last home for Arizona's Territorial government, until Arizona became a state in 1912. Initially, all three branches of the new state government occupied the four floors of the statehouse. As the state expanded the branches relocated to adjacent buildings and additions. The 1901 portion of the Capitol is now maintained as the Arizona Capitol Museum with a focus on the history and culture of Arizona. The Arizona State Library which occupied most of the 1938 addition until July 2017 re-opened in late 2018 as a part of the Arizona Capitol Museum.
Arizona State Capitol
8Wrigley Mansion
The Wrigley Mansion in Phoenix, Arizona, is a landmark building constructed between 1929 and 1931 by chewing-gum magnate William Wrigley Jr.
It is also known as William Wrigley Jr. Winter Cottage and as La Colina Solana.
Located at 2501 East Telewa Trail, it sits atop a 100-foot (30 m) knoll with views of greater Phoenix to the south, close to the Arizona Biltmore Hotel, which Wrigley owned.
Wrigley Mansion
9Ak-Chin Pavilion
Ak-Chin Pavilion (originally known as the Desert Sky Pavilion) is an amphitheater located in Phoenix, Arizona, which seats 8,106 under a pavilion roof and an additional 12,000 on a hillside behind the main stands. It opened on November 11, 1990 (Billy Joel was the venue's inaugural performer). The naming rights sponsor is the Ak-Chin Indian Community (the venue is not located on tribal land). With a total capacity of 20,000, its capacity is higher than Talking Stick Resort Arena and Gila River Arena. The amphitheater's season starts in April and closes in October.
Ak-Chin Pavilion
10Mystery Castle
Mystery Castle is located in the city of Phoenix, Arizona, in the foothills of South Mountain Park. It was built in the 1930s by Boyce Luther Gulley for his daughter Mary Lou Gulley. After learning he had tuberculosis, Gulley moved from Seattle to the Phoenix area and began building the house from found or inexpensive materials. Boyce Gulley died in 1945, and Mary Lou and her mother were notified by attorney that they had inherited the property. Shortly after, the mother and daughter moved in.
Their story attracted attention, giving the home some notoriety as well as its exotic name: A Life Magazine story (January 26, 1948) used the headline "Life Visits a Mystery Castle: A Young Girl Rules Over the Strange Secrets of a Fairy Tale Dream House in the Arizona Desert." The photograph featured Mary Lou posing atop the cantilever staircase leading to the roof of the house. That same year, Mary Lou and her mother began offering tours of the home.
Mystery Castle
Find us on :
FavRiver is a place to share and discover essential expert lists on just about any topic. The selection is made using the FavRiver scoring system which takes into account the most relevant metrics and expert reviews. FavRiver is an independent website and we do not receive any commission to be featured or when you click on links.