Here are the top places to visit in Paris, France. The selection is made using the FavRiver scoring system which takes into account the most relevant metrics and expert reviews.
Last update : Jun 12, 2019
11Panthéon
"The Panthéon ("Temple To All Gods") is a monument in the Quartier Latin in Paris. It was originally built as a church dedicated to St. Genevieve and to house her relics but, after many changes, now functions as a secular mausoleum containing the remains of distinguished French citizens. It is an early example of neo-classicism, with a façade modelled on the Pantheon in Rome, surmounted by a dome that owes some of its character to Bramante's Tempietto."
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12Moulin Rouge
"Moulin Rouge is a cabaret in Paris. The original house, which burned down in 1915, was co-founded in 1889 by Charles Zidler and Joseph Oller. Close to Montmartre in the Paris district of Pigalle in the 18th arrondissement, it is marked by the red windmill on its roof. Moulin Rouge is best known as the birthplace of the modern form of the can-can dance. Originally introduced as a seductive dance, the can-can evolved into a form of entertainment of its own and led to the introduction of cabarets across Europe. Today, the Moulin Rouge is a tourist attraction, offering musical dance entertainment for visitors from around the world. The club's decor still contains much of the romance of fin de siècle France."
13Père Lachaise Cemetery
"Père Lachaise Cemetery is the largest cemetery in Paris, France (44 hectares or 110 acres). With more than 3.5 million visitors annually, it is the most visited necropolis in the world. It is also the site of three World War I memorials. Many personalities are buried at the Père Lachaise Cemetery: artists, musicians and singers (Frédéric Chopin, Rossini, Jim Morrison, Edith Piaf, ...) and writers (Molière, Balzac, Colette, Marcel Proust, Jean de la Fontaine, Oscar Wilde, ...), statesmen, soldiers, historians, ..."
14Centre Georges Pompidou
"Centre Georges Pompidou is a complex building in the Beaubourg of Paris, near Les Halles and the Marais. It was designed in the style of high-tech architecture by the architectural team of Richard Rogers and Renzo Piano, along with Gianfranco Franchini. It houses the Bibliothèque publique d'information (Public Information Library), a vast public library; the Musée National d'Art Moderne, which is the largest museum for modern art in Europe; and IRCAM, a centre for music and acoustic research. It is named after Georges Pompidou, the President of France from 1969 to 1974 who commissioned the building. The sculpture Horizontal by Alexander Calder, a free-standing mobile that is 7.6 m (25 ft) tall, was placed in front of the Centre in 2012."
15Palais Garnier - Opera de Paris
"The Palais Garnier is a 1,979-seat opera house, which was built from 1861 to 1875 for the Paris Opera. It was called the Salle des Capucines, because of its location on the Boulevard des Capucines but soon became known as the Palais Garnier, in recognition of its opulence and its architect, Charles Garnier. The theatre is also often referred to as the Opéra Garnier and historically was known as the Opéra de Paris or simply the Opéra, as it was the primary home of the Paris Opera and its associated Paris Opera Ballet until 1989, when the Opéra Bastille opened at the Place de la Bastille. The Paris Opera now uses the Palais Garnier mainly for ballet."
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