Fascinating New Book Showcases Rare, Artistic And Educational Victorian-era Board Games

As the turn from the 18th to the 19th century approached in Great Britain, more and more parents and teachers embraced a suggestion from the philosopher John Locke that ‘learning might be made a play and recreation to children’. ‘Georgian and Victorian Board Games: The Liman Collection’ includes the most beautiful and rare games of the time collected by Arthur and Ellen Liman. Showcasing 50 games that were made for both instruction and delight, the book reflects on a transatlantic market that flourished into and through the 19th century. Although games were often printed on linen or board instead of delicate paper, many fell apart due to enthusiastic use. But those that survived open a window onto the time period in which they were created, reflecting its social and moral priorities as well as a wide range of educational subjects.

Fascinating new book showcases rare, artistic and educational Victorian era board games
“Why, What & Because: or, The Road to the Temple of Knowledge,” published by William Sallis
Fascinating new book showcases rare, artistic and educational Victorian era board games
“L’Orient, or, The Indian Travellers” (1846), published by David Ogilvy
Fascinating new book showcases rare, artistic and educational Victorian era board games
“The New Game of the Elephant and Castle, or Travelling in Asia” (1822), published by William Darton
Fascinating new book showcases rare, artistic and educational Victorian era board games
“The Majestic Game of the Asiatic Ostrich” (c. 1825), published by William Darton
Fascinating new book showcases rare, artistic and educational Victorian era board games
“The Wonders of the World” (c. 1843), published by William Spooner

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