Salvador Dali’s Fanciful Illustrations For Alice In Wonderland

On canvas and paper, Salvador Dalí created apparently nonsensical realities that nevertheless operated according to logic all their own. In writing, Lewis Carroll, author of Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland, did the very same.
It thus only makes sense, despite their differences in nationality and sensibility as well as their barely overlapping life spans, that their artistic worlds – one with its grotesquely misshapen objects, obscure symbols, and hauntingly empty vistas, the other full of wordplay, whimsy, and mathematics – would one day collide.
It happened in 1969, when an editor at Random House commissioned the master surrealist to create illustrations for an exclusive edition of Carroll’s timeless story. Dalí created 12 heliogravures: a frontispiece, which he signed in every copy from the edition, and one illustration for each chapter of the book.
For more than half a century, this unusual yet organic cross-pollination of genius remained an almost mythic artifact, reserved for collectors and scholars, until Princeton University Press decided to reprint it for Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland’s 150th anniversary. The rare work is now available to Dali lovers everywhere.

Salvador Dalis fanciful illustrations for Alice in Wonderland
Frontispiece for Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland
Salvador Dalis fanciful illustrations for Alice in Wonderland
Down the Rabbit Hole
Salvador Dalis fanciful illustrations for Alice in Wonderland
The Pool of Tears
Salvador Dalis fanciful illustrations for Alice in Wonderland
The Caucus Race and a Long Tale
Salvador Dalis fanciful illustrations for Alice in Wonderland
The Rabbit Sends in a Little Bill

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