The U.S. Government Poisoned Alcohol During Prohibition Killing Over 10,000 People

Although mostly forgotten today, the “chemist’s war of Prohibition” remains one of the strangest and most deadly decisions in American law-enforcement history. Frustrated that people continued to consume so much alcohol even after it was banned, federal officials had decided to try a different kind of enforcement. They ordered the poisoning of industrial alcohols manufactured in the United States, products regularly stolen by bootleggers and resold as drinkable spirits. The idea was to scare people into giving up illicit drinking. Instead, by the time Prohibition ended in 1933, the federal poisoning program, by some estimates, had killed at least 10,000 people.

The U.S. government poisoned alcohol during Prohibition killing over 10,000 people
Governor James P. Goodrich signs the Indiana Prohibition act, 1917.

The U.S. government poisoned alcohol during Prohibition killing over 10,000 people

The U.S. government poisoned alcohol during Prohibition killing over 10,000 people
Orange County (California) sheriff’s deputies dumping illegal alcohol, 1932
The U.S. government poisoned alcohol during Prohibition killing over 10,000 people
Removal of liquor during Prohibition.
The U.S. government poisoned alcohol during Prohibition killing over 10,000 people
Detroit police inspecting equipment found in a clandestine brewery during the Prohibition era.

The U.S. government poisoned alcohol during Prohibition killing over 10,000 people

The U.S. government poisoned alcohol during Prohibition killing over 10,000 people
A police raid confiscating illegal alcohol, in Elk Lake, Canada, in 1925.
The U.S. government poisoned alcohol during Prohibition killing over 10,000 people
A policeman with wrecked automobile and confiscated moonshine, 1922
The U.S. government poisoned alcohol during Prohibition killing over 10,000 people
Prohibition agents with a 2000-gallon illicit still, seized near Waldorf, Maryland, circa 1925.

Links: TimeSlate – Wikipedia

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